September 7, 2007

Mental Health

A total of 140 children under the age of 18 were admitted to adult psychiatric centres between November

Medicine Weekly (Tue, 4 Sep 2007)

A total of 140 children under the age of 18 were admitted to adult psychiatric centres between November 2006 and July 2007.  According to the latest figures from the Mental Health Commission (MHC), 16 children were admitted to approved adult psychiatric centres in July 2007. Back in May the figure was 23 — the highest monthly total over the nine-month period. The youngest child admitted was just 13 years of age.

Mental health problems 'bigger than cancer'

Irish Health (Tue, 4 Sep 2007)

Mental illness makes up about 14% of global disease, more than cancer or heart disease, according to a major international study. The huge gaps in mental health services across the world have also been revealed.  The study found that one in three people with schizophrenia and one in two with other mental disorders do not receive any treatment. 

Thousands of teens sign up to emotional support service

Online.ie  (Tue, 28 Aug 2007)

Around 2,000 teenagers registered for a special text-based emotional support service in its first 48 hours, it emerged today. More than 4,500 have signed-up since its launch by Rehab just over a fortnight ago, which provides confidential information to young adults in the areas of relationships, suicide, teen issues, sexual and mental health.

Bullies force increase in staff seeking medical treatment                                                                 

Irish Examiner  (Fri, 7 Sep 2007)

An increasing number of workers are seeking medical treatment as a. result of workplace bullying, a conference will hear later this month. The open access public meeting is organised by the Royal College of Physicians in Ireland and will highlight the growing number of workers presenting to GPs with bullying-related stress and other symptoms.

South Tipperary Befriending                                                                                                           

South Tipp Today (Wed, 5 Sep 2007)

Community-Based Service of South Tipperary Mental Health and Voluntary Housing Association. This is a befriending service for people living in the community who are experiencing Mental Health difficulties.  Research has shown that one in four people will experience mental health problems at some time in their lives. For those people social isolation is a common problem, as after discharge from hospital (short or long term) their confidence and self esteem can be very low, and they find it difficult to access social, recreational and cultural amenities.

 

Suicide Prevention

North/South join forces on suicide prevention

Medicine Weekly (Tue, 4 Sep 2007)

Junior Health Minister Dr Jim Devins has announced plans to meet with Northern Ireland Health Minister Mr Michael McGimpsey to progress North/South collaboration on suicide prevention.  Speaking at the 24th biennial conference of the International Association of Suicide Prevention in Killarney, Minister Devins said Ireland as an island was united in its efforts to tackle suicide and mental illness.

Under-reporting of suicide

Medicine Weekly (Tue, 4 Sep 2007)

Junior Health Minister Dr Jim Devins has announced plans to meet with Northern Ireland Health Minister Mr Michael McGimpsey to progress North/South collaboration on suicide prevention. Speaking at the 24th biennial conference of the International Association of Suicide Prevention in Killarney, Minister Devins said Ireland as an island was united in its efforts to tackle suicide and mental illness.

Coroner refuses to limit inquest findings

Eircom.net (Wed, 5 Sep 2007)

A coroner yesterday refused to rule
out making a finding of gross medical negligence when he hears an inquest into the death of a man denied a hospital psychiatric bed. Steven McAdam is alleged to have driven his car off a pier into the sea two days after being discharged from Craigavon hospital because no psychiatric beds were available. A coroner yesterday refused to rule out making a finding of gross medical negligence when he hears an inquest into the death of a man denied a hospital psychiatric bed.

'New way' of farming is a factor in young rural suicide increase                                                      

Galway City Tribune (Fri, 31 Aug 2007)

Industrial farming must be radically changed to sustain rural communities, the environment and the human spirit if a growing trend of suicide among young rural men is to be tackled, a seminar heard this week.  Fr. Harry Bohan was addressing a seminar organised by Teagasc in Athenry on rural suicide.  The sociologist and author from Co. Clare said the dramatic changes in the Irish rural landscape and farming were impacting on society as a whole.  Gone are the days of communal activities such as 'saving the hay' and spending days in the bog and instead farmers had become isolated in a shftft space of time, Fr. Bohan said. 

THE FAMILIES
                                                                                                                                            Sunday Tribune (Sun, 2 Sep 2007)

The doctor-patient confidentiality clause has always been regarded as sacred, but psychiatrists are now coming under fire from suicide-prevention groups who say their failure to involve family members in a loved one's treatment is leading to loss of life

Gay groups welcome comments by McAleese                                                                                     

Irish Independent (Sat, 1 Sept 2007)

Gay support groups have commended the President for making 'compassionate' remarks about homosexuality just days after a priest said people "that way inclined had to get over it".  The Gay and Lesbian Equality Network (GLEN) and Gay Community News praised President Mary McAleese for linking gay bullying with suicide publicly for the first time at a conference yesterday.  They also welcomed her open approach to the issue and her observation that for young people, homosexuality was "a discovery, not a decision".

Our culture is 'driving young over the edge'                                                &
nbsp;                                 

Sunday Independent (Sun, 2 Sept 2007)

One of the country's leading consultant psychiatrists warns that one in five Irish teenagers has psychiatric problems.  Dr David McNamara, who runs the specialist Adolescent Unit in St John of God's Institute, Dublin, believes that our present work-obsessed, religion-free, drug-and-alcohol tolerant culture is driving adolescents over the edge: "About 20 per cent of adolescents would have a psychological disturbance, and between two and five per cent have a moderate-to-severe psychiatric disability – it's a lot.” 

Suicide among elderly often goes unrecorded, experts claim                                                            

Irish Independent (Mon, 3 Sep 2007)

Mary McAleese yesterday called for an end to the culture of binge drinking.  But she conceded there was a lot of work to be done making people aware of the consequences of alcohol abuse and the damage it caused.  The President, who was addressing an international conference on suicide in Killarney, referred to the pain and misery caused by alcohol in Irish society.  "It's a spectrum of turbulence that we can all do without," she said.

Depression

Depression causes more damage than illness                                                                                

Irish Independent, (Fri, 7 Sep 2007)

Depression is more damaging to everyday health than chronic diseases such as angina, arthritis, asthma and diabetes, researchers have said. And if people are ill with other conditions, depression makes them worse, the researchers found. "We report the largest population-based worldwide study to our knowledge that explores the effect of depression in comparison with four other chronic diseases on health state," the researchers wrote in the 'Lancet' medical journal.

Schizophrenia

Positive signs after human trial of schizophrenia drug                                                                        

Irish Examiner (Tues, 4 Sep 2007)

There are many different drug treatments for schizophrenia The first human trial of a new schizophrenia drug has yielded promising results, report scientists. ' What sets the experimental drug apart from all other antipsychotics is its target in the brain, glutamate receptors rather than dopamine. Patients treated with "LY2140023" showed improvements in symptoms and few side effects. Experts said the Nature Medicine study, by drug firm Eli Lilly, was promising and should prompt further trials.

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