Depression and Anxiety

Depression and anxiety are both common mental health conditions that can occur separately or together. According to Aware, approximately 450,000 people in Ireland experience depression at any one time. In this section you will find reporting guidelines relating to depression and anxiety, along with definitions of these conditions.

Advice for reporting on depression and anxiety

Always include contact details of a support line for those impacted by the article or programme.

Relevant Irish numbers include:

The Samaritans
116 123 (available 24/7)

 
Aware (depression and bipolar)
1800 80 48 48 or supportmail@aware.ie

Use the correct medical terms

✘ Avoid using language such as ‘madman’, ‘crazy’, or ‘lunatic’. These terms further stigmatise those living with mental health issues.

Avoid linking depression and violence.

It has been proven that a mental health diagnosis is not a predictor of violent behaviour. Drawing this connection can add to the stigma which targets people living with these conditions.

Frame your discussion of medication with caution.

Never encourage readers to stop taking medication without medical supervision. Always back up claims about medication effects or side effects with a quote from a qualified mental health professional.

Avoid sensationalising depression, anxiety, or other mental health issue in the headline of an article.

Consider if reporting a mental health diagnosis is relevant to the story

Some people may not want their diagnosis discussed.

Ensure accuracy & balance

Include comments from a mental health professional or organisation.

Include comments from a person living with the condition in order to ensure accurate and balanced reporting.

Where possible, try to include positive stories of people living successfully with depression or anxiety.

Use of stereotypical or negative stock imagery.

Consider any images being used, such as someone pulling their hair, or a person in a straight jacket. Are they necessary or negative, as negative images can further perpetuate stigma.

Aim to challenge commonly held misconceptions about depression and anxiety.

Examples of these can be found in our Myths and Facts on this page.

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

Depression & Anxiety Quick Reference Guide

Depression

Depression is a common condition that causes people to experience depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt or low self-worth, disturbed sleep or appetite, low energy, and poor concentration. If depression becomes chronic or recurrent, it can cause considerable impairments in the ability to take care of daily responsibilities.

Depression occurs in persons of all ages, genders, and backgrounds. It affects approximately 121 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of disability.

Depression can be reliably diagnosed and successfully treated, although fewer than 25% of affected individuals have access to effective treatment.

Postnatal Depression

Also called postpartum depression, this condition impacts women around the time of child birth. Some women can be affect by perinatal depression, which occurs during pregnancy. These conditions are characterised by extreme sadness, anxiety, changes in appetite, loss of interest or pleasure in life, and lack of interest in the baby. Perinatal and postnatal depression are different to the ‘baby blues’.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a feeling of worry or fear that can range from mild to extreme. While everyone can feel anxious at times about situations such as an exam or an interview, people with anxiety disorders can find it hard to control their worries. Feelings of anxiety and distress can often impact their daily lives. Anxiety can also be the primary symptom of conditions such as panic disorder, agoraphobia, and generalised anxiety disorder.

previous arrow
next arrow
Slider

Audiences can react to your content in unpredictable, and sometimes harmful ways. Journalists and producers are advised to provide details of helplines alongside any potentially harmful or triggering content. For audiences needing help dealing with issues around depression or anxiety you can direct them to:

The Samaritans
116 123
(available 24/7)

 

Aware (depression and bipolar)
1800 80 48 48
or supportmail@aware.ie

The Samaritans
116 123
(available 24/7)

Aware (depression and bipolar)
1800 80 48 48
or supportmail@aware.ie

About Headline

Headline is Ireland’s national programme for responsible reporting, and representation of mental illness and suicide. Our objective is to work as collaboratively as possible with Irish media professionals across print, broadcast, and online platforms to reduce the effects of suicide contagion, and the stigma attached to mental ill health.

Accessibility